Bob Edwards Show Schedule

Monday, February 15, 2010  
Today we honor President’s Day by replaying Bob’s interview with Pulitzer Prize-winner Joseph J. Ellis about his book, His Excellency: George Washington.
 
Tuesday, February 16, 2010
President’s Week continues. First, Bob talks with Doris Kearns Goodwin about her book Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln  – it’s an exploration of the men and women who worked with the 16th President. Then, Bob talks to David Mark, former editor-in-chief of Campaigns and Elections magazine about his book Getting Dirty: The Art of Negative Campaigning.
                                                                                                                                                                                          
Wednesday, February 17, 2010 
We bring back Bob’s 2004 interview with authors W. Marvin Watson and Sherwin Markman about their book Chief of Staff: Lyndon Johnson and His Presidency. Then, Bob talks with Bob Greene about his goal in the 1980’s and 90’s to meet and chat with everyone in the world’s most exclusive boys’ club. The result is his book, Fraternity: A Journey in Search of Five Presidents.
 
Thursday, February 18, 2010  
Our week of honoring US Presidents (and candidates) continues with Senator and presidential candidate Bill Bradley. He believes that Americans are being told a false story about this country.  He offers a different one in his book, The New American Story.  Then, before radio and television, presidential candidates used song to convey messages and influence voters.  And just like today, tapping into fear was a popular tactic. Our resident folklorists Nancy Groce and Steve Winick from the Library of Congress share campaign songs from the past and present.
 
Friday, February 19, 2010  
David Broder of The Washington Post joins Bob live to talk politics. Then, in this week’s installment of our ongoing series This I Believe, Bob talks with curator Dan Gediman about the essay of Genevieve B. Earle.  She was a social worker and head of the Brooklyn branch of the League of Women Voters. In 1937, she became the first woman to be elected to the New York City Counsel, where she served as minority leader of the body.