The Bob Edwards Show (September 28-30, 2015) Last Ones Ever

Monday, September 28, 2015: As we near the end of the show, we’re featuring some of our best-loved productions and some real fan favorites. Today, we bring back Bob’s time in the studio with Carol Kaye and her bass guitar. Kaye was the session bassist of the 1960s and 70s, playing on dozens and dozens of hits for the likes of The Beach Boys, Ritchie Valens, Simon & Garfunkel, The Supremes, Ray Charles and the Monkees. It’s estimated that Kaye has been involved with more than ten-thousand recording sessions in her career. Kaye and her bass are also responsible for the distinctive bass notes of the Mission Impossible theme. Bob thoroughly enjoyed this conversation and we think you will too.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015: Bob talks with filmmaker Alex Gibney about his documentary titled Taxi to the Dark Side.  It examines the Bush administration’s policy on torture through the death of taxi driver in Afghanistan.  The film won the 2008 Oscar for best documentary AND a Peabody Award. Then, Marc Maron began his standup career as a contemporary of the late Sam Kinison, and though he’s toured extensively, recorded comedy CDs, appeared on talk shows dozens of times and held prominent jobs in media, personal problems including addiction laid Maron low by 2005. At his nadir, Maron began recording conversations with his friends and fellow comedians for a podcast called “WTF,” which today stands as a cornerstone of the medium. The underdog success of “WTF” sparked a career renaissance for Maron, who has since starred in his own show on the Independent Film Channel and written a book, titled Attempting Normal.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015: For our final broadcast, we offer this gift to you. Bob talks with fan-favorite Jack Gantos about his new book titled The Trouble in Me. We’ll hear from members of the production staff about some of their fondest memories of the show. Next Bob sits down in the studio to be interviewed by Charlie Summers, this program’s biggest fan. Then several of our former contributors and favorite guests wills top by to say so long. We’ll also hear messages of appreciation and farewell from many loyal listeners who wanted to lend their voice to our last show.

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 25-26, 2015) The Last One Ever

HOUR ONE:

Today is the final broadcast of this program. Consider this hour a special parting gift to you – our loyal listeners.  And speaking of listeners, some of you took the time to record personal messages of appreciation and farewell and we’ll share that audio. You’ll also hear from many former producers on their favorite conversations. Several former contributors and fan-favorite guests are saying goodbye too. Bob will also talk with author Jack Gantos about his latest book titled The Trouble in Me and Bob will answer questions himself asked by this show’s biggest fan.

 

HOUR TWO: 

We present our two favorite interviews gathered during a reporting trip to Nashville.  First is a visit to the home of Guy Clark to discuss his career, his music and his handmade instruments. Bob talks with Clark in a basement room that performs double duty as a guitar building workshop and as a song writing room. Then Marty Stuart shows us around his stunning personal museum of country music memorabilia.  He shows us artifacts such as Johnny Cash’s first ever black suit, Patsy Cline’s final pair of boots and the handwritten lyrics for some of Hank Williams’ biggest hits.  

The Bob Edwards Show (September 21-25, 2015)

Monday, September 21, 2015: Bob talks to musician, rehabilitated drug addict, ex-con, liver recipient and sperm donor David Crosby.  We talked about all that and more and he wrote about it in his book titled Since Then: How I Survived EVERYTHING and Lived to Tell About It. We also discuss much of his music as presented in Crosby’s 3-CD boxed set called Voyage.  It features tracks from his time with The Byrds – the super group Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – and from his solo career.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015: Today we replay our most popular and our most powerful original documentary. It’s one last encore presentation of our award-winning show Stories from Third Med: Surviving a Jungle ER.  The documentary includes stories of the Navy’s Third Medical Battalion, which served alongside the Third Marine Division. They were based near the DMZ, closest to the enemy in North Vietnam. Decades later, the doctors and corpsmen recount the horror they can never forget, and reflect on the forces that drive men to war in the first place.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015: Bob speaks with Larry King at his favorite hangout, the Nate ‘n Al Delicatessen in Beverly Hills. They reminisce about King’s five decades in broadcasting. Then we’ll mark the birthday of Bruce Springsteen. Peter Ames Carlin has written well-regarded and exhaustively researched biographies on Paul McCartney and The Beach Boys. He’s also turned his journalistic eye to “The Boss.” Carlin joins Bob to talk about rock-n-roll’s working class hero and his book titled Bruce. 

Thursday, September 24, 2015: Bob visits with Annie Leibovitz one of the world’s best known photographers.  She’s been the featured portrait photographer for Vanity Fair magazine since 1983, and her images of celebrities and public figures have reached an iconic status.  When she was our guest, Washington DC’s Corcoran Gallery was exhibiting images featured in her book titled Annie Leibovitz At Work. Then, another creative type. Amy Krouse Rosenthal likes to make things: books, for small people and big, short videos, and “connections with the universe.”  Her collection of videos is charming and addictive – in “Life is a Marathon,” she greets commuters exiting the train station with posters, high fives, and water.  Rosenthal talks to Bob about creativity, getting something out of nothing, and why she does what she does.

Friday, September 25, 2015: Today, we present our two favorite interviews gathered during a reporting trip to Nashville.  First is a visit to the home of Guy Clark to discuss his career, his music and his handmade instruments. Bob talks with Clark in a basement room that performs double duty as a guitar building workshop and as a song writing room. Then Marty Stuart shows us around his stunning personal museum of country music memorabilia.  He shows us artifacts such as Johnny Cash’s first ever black suit, Patsy Cline’s final pair of boots and the handwritten lyrics for some of Hank Williams’ biggest hits.  

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 19-20, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

The Cold War is over and with the collapse of the Soviet Union, there is little threat of an all-out, mutually destructive nuclear war.  But investigative journalist Eric Schlosser points out that most of those weapons are still out there…and many of them are still on hair-trigger alert.  In his book Command and Control, he writes that school children no longer practice to “duck and cover” — even as the danger of an accidental war or accidental nuclear detonations may have increased. Drawing on thousands of pages of recently declassified government documents and on interviews with scores of military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser writes about our illusion of safety when it comes to today’s nuclear weapons.

Then Bob checks in with Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten on his latest project. Weingarten is still pulling together stories relating to one day chosen at random – December 28, 1986.  The forthcoming book will be called One Day and will prove that old journalism axiom that good stories can be found anywhere.

 

HOUR TWO: 

Today we replay our most popular and our most powerful original documentary. It’s one last encore presentation of our award-winning show Stories from Third Med: Surviving a Jungle ER.  The documentary features stories of the Navy’s Third Medical Battalion, which served alongside the Third Marine Division. They were based near the DMZ, closest to the enemy in North Vietnam. They shared their dramatic and emotional stories with us four decades later, told over a soundtrack of the music that meant everything to them in the late 1960s.

The Bob Edwards Show (September 14-18, 2015)

           

Monday, September 14, 2015: Bob talks with Australian writer Tim Winton about his award-winning collection of connected short stories, The Turning: New Stories. In 1998, Australia declared Winton a “national living treasure” and in 2005 the book won the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction. Bob talks with guitarist Ben Harper and harmonica master Charlie Musselwhite about their CD titled Get Up! The two occasional collaborators have wanted to record a full album together for over a decade and finally found the time after first clicking musically at a 1997 recording session with John Lee Hooker. 

 

Tuesday, September 15, 2015: Any fan of Libby Gelman-Waxner’s monthly column, “If You Ask Me,” in Premiere magazine (1987-2007) could tell you all about Libby’s home life and her hilarious observations on Hollywood and films.  But many of those fans never knew that “Libby” was actually a pseudonym for screenwriter, playwright, and novelist Paul Rudnick, one of America’s greatest humorists.  Rudnick talks with Bob about his memoir titled I Shudder: And Other Reactions to Life, Death, and New Jersey. You know “snark” when you hear it: It’s biting, mean, condescension disguised as high-brow teasing.  Maureen Dowd is very good at it, and so was Cicero.  New Yorker film critic David Denby says it is “spreading like pinkeye through the media” and weakening the public discourse.  His book on the subject is titled Snark.

 

Wednesday, September 16, 2015: In his book Freedom’s Forge, Arthur Herman tells a little-known story from World War II: how two American businessmen—the President of General Motors William Knudsen and construction giant Henry Kaiser—oversaw an output of war materials including weapons, tanks, planes, guns, and ammunition – that almost defies imagination. Herman calls it the greatest industrial miracle in history, and makes the case that these men changed the face of not only American business and industry but of American society. Then military journalist and author Stephen Harding shares another unlikely but true story. It’s all in the subtitle of his book The Last Battle: When U.S. and German Soldiers Joined Forces in the Waning Hours of World War II in Europe.

 

Thursday, September 17, 2015: Mark Frauenfelder is co-founder of the most popular blog in the world www.boingboing.net and Editor in Chief of Make magazine, which advocates for Americans to re-engage with the physical world.  Bob talks to Frauenfelder about the Do-it-yourself movement and its promise to reinvigorate traditional American values like resourcefulness, creativity and thrift.  He also has some good ideas about how to have fun making cool stuff and reducing the amount of disposable items in our lives. Then Bob talks to Rafe Sagarin, marine ecologist and author of Learning from the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters and Disease.

 

Friday, September 18, 2015: The Cold War is over and with the collapse of the Soviet Union, there is little threat of an all-out, mutually destructive nuclear war.  But investigative journalist Eric Schlosser points out that most of those weapons are still out there…and many of them are still on hair-trigger alert.  In his book Command and Control, he writes that school children no longer practice to “duck and cover” — even as the danger of an accidental war or accidental nuclear detonations may have increased. Drawing on thousands of pages of recently declassified government documents and on interviews with scores of military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser writes about our illusion of safety when it comes to today’s nuclear weapons. Then Bob checks in with Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten on his latest project. Weingarten is still pulling together stories relating to one day chosen at random – December 28, 1986.  The forthcoming book will be called One Day and will prove that old journalism axiom that good stories can be found anywhere.

 

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 12-13, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

Bob talks with investigative journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn about their book titled 102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers.  Their gripping work was the first minute-by-minute history of 9/11 told from the perspective of the people trapped inside the World Trade Center - 14 years ago. Then, for his documentary Objects and Memory sculptor and filmmaker Jonathan Fein visited Ground Zero in New York, the site of the Oklahoma City bombing and the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial to explore the power and poignancy of objects retrieved from and left at those sites.

 

HOUR TWO:

As we near the end of the show, we’re featuring some of best-loved productions and some real fan favorites. Today, we bring back Bob’s time in the studio with Carol Kaye and her bass guitar. Kaye was the session bassist of the 1960s and 70s, playing on dozens and dozens of hits for the likes of The Beach Boys, Ritchie Valens, Simon & Garfunkel, The Supremes, Ray Charles and the Monkees. It’s estimated that Kaye has been involved with more than ten-thousand recording sessions in her career. Kaye and her bass are also responsible for the distinctive bass notes of the Mission Impossible theme.  Bob thoroughly enjoyed this conversation and we think you will too.

 

The Bob Edwards Show (September 7-11, 2015)

           

Monday, September 7, 2015: We spent last week remembering the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Today Bob talks with Lawrence Powell of Tulane University who reminds us of the city’s long, rich history – and what was almost lost in 2005. He’s the author of The Accidental City and the book covers the period from the first hunters, trappers and explorers in the region through the end of The War of 1812.  Then, Bob talks with Joey Burns, a founding member of the band Calexico. Burns will discuss the band’s music, branded by some as “desert noir,” Calexico’s home base of Tucson, Arizona, their ideas for immigration reform and why they decided to record their seventh studio album in New Orleans. That CD is called Algiers.

 

Tuesday, September 8, 2015: For fifty years, Frank Deford has been dissecting the sporting world and interviewing some of the most famous and important athletes and coaches around.  He has covered just about every sport, in every medium, and he wrote about it all in his memoir, Over Time: My Life as a Sportswriter. Then, another of Bob’s old friends, John Feinstein, talks about golf, basketball, football and tennis – all of which he covered in his book titled One on One: Behind the Scenes with the Greats in the Game.  Feinstein is famously the author of A Season on the Brink, the bestselling sports book of all time. 

 

Wednesday, September 9, 2015: Egyptian-American comedian Ahmed Ahmed is here to discuss his documentary called Just Like Us. He brought fellow stand-ups on a historic tour of the Middle East, with shows in Dubai, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The film is not just about the comedy, but gives a real sense of the people and the places prior to the revolutions which swept through the region. Then we’ll hear Ahmed as part of a comedy odd couple. He first appeared on our show way back in 2004 with Rabbi Bob Alper. Back then their stage show was called One Arab, One Jew, One Stage. The pair just recently performed together again in Israel – including stops in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa.

 

Thursday, September 10, 2015: Bob talks with Ernie Colon, co-author of The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation.  The book condenses the nearly 600-page federal report into a 150 page comic book. Colon has worked in the comic industry for years, drawing the “Richie Rich” series as well as “Casper the Friendly Ghost.” Next, after 9/11, a small group of officials were tasked with using the financial powers of the United States government to find and dismantle illegal financial supply chains used by terrorists.  Author Juan Zarate explores one of the least-examined strategies in the war on terror with his book Treasury’s War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare.  Then, for his documentary Objects and Memory filmmaker Jonathan Fein visited Ground Zero in New York, the site of the Oklahoma City bombing and the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial to explore the power and poignancy of objects retrieved from and left at those sites.

 

Friday, September 11, 2015: Bob talks with investigative journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn about their book titled 102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers.  Their gripping work was the first minute-by-minute history of 9/11 told from the perspective of the people trapped inside the World Trade Center on this morning 14 years ago.

Bob Edwards Weekend (September 5-6, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Today we present the culmination of our week-long coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the flooding it caused in New Orleans 10 years ago. We’ll hear from journalists Dan Baum and Mark Schleifstein; social anthropolgist Kate Browne; musicians Ben Jaffe and Paul Sanchez; storm survivors Arthur Garrett, Eric Brown and Errol Perez; and urban farmers Ronald Terry and Michael Beauchamp.

 

HOUR TWO:

We spent the week remembering the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Today Bob talks with Lawrence Powell of Tulane University who reminds us of the city’s long, rich history – and what was almost lost in 2005. He’s the author of The Accidental City and the book covers the period from the first hunters, trappers and explorers in the region through the end of The War of 1812.  Then, Bob talks with Joey Burns, a founding member of the band Calexico. Burns will discuss the band’s music, branded by some as “desert noir,” Calexico’s home base of Tucson, Arizona, their ideas for immigration reform and why they decided to record their seventh studio album in New Orleans. That CD is called Algiers.

The Bob Edwards Show (August 31-September 4, 2015)

 

Monday, August 31, 2015: All this week, we’re remembering the destruction Hurricane Katrina caused in the New Orleans area ten years ago. Bob talks with Mark Schleifstein, a reporter for the Times Picayune, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his post-Katrina coverage. Next, Bob visits with Shirley Laska, the founder of the Center for Hazards Assessment Response and Technology (CHART) at the University of New Orleans. She predicted the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina, and her center studies coastal communities, examining the ways people cope with frequent disasters. Journalist Dan Baum arrived in New Orleans two days after Hurricane Katrina and spent years reporting on the disaster and its aftermath. He wrote a book called Nine Lives about what happened in New Orleans between the twin catastrophes of Hurricane Betsy in 1965 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005.  Baum covered those 40 years by telling the stories of nine citizens. Coleman deKay and Paul Sanchez took those stories and set them to music. Their CD is titled Nine Lives: A Musical Adaptation and features New Orleans musicians and singers.

 

Tuesday, September 1, 2015: Today we continue a week-long series of conversations about New Orleans and how the city and the surrounding area was changed by Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of 2005. Bob talks with funny man Harry Shearer about his deadly serious documentary titled The Big Uneasy. It tells the story of the UNnatural disaster caused by Katrina. The focus is on three scientists who tried to warn of the danger before the hurricane hit — or who tried to investigate the aftermath of the flooding and the many obstacles they faced. Tia Lessin and Carl Deal were horrified by the destruction Hurricane Katrina brought to New Orleans. The filmmakers flew to Louisiana a week after the storm hit and met Kimberly Roberts and her husband Scott who filmed their experiences on a second-hand camcorder. Lessin and Deal incorporated that raw footage — documenting a frustrating wait for help — into their film titled Trouble the Water.

 

Wednesday, September 2, 2015: We continue our series on the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina today. We’ll examine the struggles of two different families as they returned to their homes in hard-hit St. Bernard Parish. First we visit Errol Perez. He evacuated to northern Louisiana before Katrina, and it took him almost five years to move back home. Next, Bob talks with cultural anthropologist and documentary filmmaker Kate Browne about what she learned by following the journey of an extended Creole family scattered by Katrina. The documentary is titled, Still Waiting. Then Bob talks with Sheri Fink about her book titled Five Days at Memorial. Her book chronicles a grim string of events at Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans during and immediately after Hurricane Katrina. 

 

Thursday, September 3, 2015: We continue our series of conversations marking the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Today, Bob joins former mayor Maurice “Moon” Landrieu and his daughter Madeleine Landrieu for a history lesson and a driving tour of the destruction caused by the flooding - damage which still cuts across social and economic boundaries of the city. Then, we visit with New Hope Baptist Church deacons Arthur Garrett and Eric Brown about life – and life in New Orleans – since Katrina.

 

Friday, September 4, 2015: We conclude our series on Hurricane Katrina and the destruction it caused in New Orleans and the surrounding parishes. Bob gets an update from cultural anthropologist Kate Browne on the struggles of the extended Creole family she’s been documenting for the past ten years. Browne’s new book is titled Standing in the Need: Culture, Comfort and Coming Home after Katrina. Next, local musician Ben Jaffe shows us around Preservation Hall, the music venue started by his parents, and reminds us about some of the unique characteristics of New Orleans. Finally - we visit with local community organizer Paul Baricos at the Hollygrove Market and Farm in New Orleans and meet two of the farmers working there to help rebuild the roots of their neighborhood. Ronald Terry is a mentor farmer specializing in miniature fruit trees and Michael Beauchamp is a community gardener who grows his own vegetables and flowers in plots at the urban farm.

 

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 29-30, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

Today we’re presenting some of our favorite musical performance chats. Indiana sisters Lily and Madeleine Jurkiewicz join Bob in our performance studio to discuss the beginning of their music career and to play a few songs from their self-titled album Lily & Madeleine. Then Bob sits down for a performance chat with musician Chad Lawson.  He’s an award-winning pianist and his latest CD is titled The Chopin Variations.  They discuss what it’s like to be an independent artist trying to make a career in today’s music world.

 

HOUR TWO:

Settle in for more of our favorite musical performance chats. First up, singer-songwriter Josh Ritter talks with Bob and performs a few songs from his CD, The Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter. Then, Patty Larkin joins Bob in the performance studio to play songs from her latest album Still Green.  Much of the CD was written in a primitive shack on the remote dunes of Cape Cod.

 

The Bob Edwards Show (August 24-28)

Monday, August 24, 2015: This week, we present another round of some of our favorite musical performance chats from the past decade. Today, Bob talks with Reggie Pace and Lance Koehler about founding their band called No BS Brass!  With four trombones, three trumpets, a sax, a tuba and drums, the band can really make some noise. They’ve been rocking fans in the Richmond, Virginia area for years, now the band is hoping to introduce its sound to the rest of the country. They will start by blowing the windows out of our performance studio.  Then, Bob sits down with 12 members of the Austin-based classical collective Mother Falcon for a private concert in our performance studio.  They’ll play a few songs from their “orchestral rock” album titled You Knew and discuss the unique challenges that face such a large band when on tour.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015: We continue our series of musical performance chats with Lily and Madeleine Jurkiewicz.  The Indiana sisters join Bob in our performance studio to discuss the beginning of their music career and to play a few songs from their self-titled album Lily & Madeleine. Then Bob sits down for a performance chat with musician Chad Lawson.  He’s an award-winning pianist and his latest CD is titled The Chopin Variations.  They discuss what it’s like to be an independent artist trying to make a career in today’s music world.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015: All this week, we’re presenting some of our favorite musical performance chats from the past decade. Singer-songwriter David Wilcox has been characterized as a cross between musicians James Taylor and Nick Drake. Although his music does have a quiet, acoustic feel, its tone and message are unique to this guitarist. His album Airstream was written over two years as Wilcox, his wife, and their son traveled across America touring. He plays selections from the records and talks with Bob about his career in music. Then, Bob talks with Jimmy Carter and other members of The Blind Boys of Alabama about the Grammy-winning gospel group’s album called I’ll Find a Way. It was produced by Justin Vernon of the indie folk group Bon Iver and features guest appearances by a new generation of fans of the Blind Boys.

Thursday, August 27, 2015: We continue our series of some of our favorite musical performance chats. Today, singer-songwriter Josh Ritter talks with Bob and performs a few songs from his CD, The Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter. Then, Patty Larkin joins Bob in the performance studio to play songs from her latest album Still Green.  Her 13th recording, much of the album was written in a primitive shack on the remote dunes of Cape Cod.   You can hear Larkin playing no less than seven instruments on the album —- acoustic and electric guitars, mandolin, bass, slide guitar, keyboards and kalimba.   

Friday, August 28, 2015: Today we conclude our week-long series of musical performance chats. For more than 50 years, the male choral group Ladysmith Black Mambazo has kept alive the traditional sounds of their home land.  These three-time Grammy winners were South Africa’s first black musicians to receive gold record status.  They crowd into our performance studio to sing a few traditional childhood tunes from their album called Songs from a Zulu Farm. Then, Sweet Honey in the Rock, the internationally renowned all-female vocal ensemble, brings its powerhouse sound to our performance studio for a conversation with Bob and to share a few of their songs.  The Grammy award-winning group was founded in 1973 and took their name from Psalm 81:16. 

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 22-23, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Capital punishment is a controversial topic. The death penalty is debated…death row inmates are sometimes granted clemency…sometimes, new evidence clears them completely. But there is another, quieter death penalty being served right now by roughly 50,000 American prisoners. They are inmates who have been sentenced to “life without parole” – who are destined to live the rest of their lives behind bars. They know that they won’t leave until they die. Bob talks with husband and wife filmmakers Alan and Susan Raymond about their brand new documentary on the subject called Toe Tag Parole.

 

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with former astronaut Chris Hadfield about a few of his 4,000 hours spent in space, and about his book An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything.  While on his mission aboard the International Space Station, Hadfield attracted the world’s attention when he released a series of photos and educational videos about life in space. His version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity received over 10 million views in its first three days online.

Then – we’ll remember our trip down to Cape Canaveral to witness a night launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. Bob talks with public radio’s resident expert on NASA and the space program, Pat Duggins. He’s written several books on the subject, including Final Countdown which deals with the end of the Shuttle program.

 

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 17-21, 2015)

Monday, August 17, 2015: One of the most legendary moments in rock-n-roll history started with an ad placed in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal:  “Young men with unlimited capital looking for interesting, legitimate investment opportunities and business propositions.”   That “Aquarian Exposition” took place 46 years ago this weekend.  Greg Walter worked on the backstage crew of Woodstock and came away with more than his share of stories, which he includes in Woodstock: A New Look - along with photographs he shot during the festival.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015: A trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council since 1974, Robert Redford has dedicated nearly as much of his life to the environment as he has to filmmaking.  Redford joined Bob on stage at the Lincoln Center in front of a live audience in 2009 to talk about his film career, his support for young artists, the many NRDC campaigns he has supported in the past – and why that work will still be needed for years to come. Today is Redford’s 79th birthday.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015: In the UK it was published as Alex’s Adventures in Numberland.  The US version has a cleverly improved title, Here’s Looking at Euclid.  Whatever the title, Alex Bellos has managed to write a best-selling book all about math. Bellos traveled around the world interviewing people whose lives are connected to math.  Bellos’ ambition is to prove to a wider audience - starting with Bob - that “the world of math is a remarkable place.”

Thursday, August 20, 2015: Clay Johnson is the founder of Blue State Digital which built and managed Barack Obama’s online presidential campaign.  Now Johnson says we not only suffer from information overload, but we have lost the ability to filter the average eleven hours of data we ingest every day.  He describes the problem and offers some advice in his book titled, The Information Diet: a Case for Conscious Consumption. Then Ronald Bishop explores our society’s obsession with triviality, extravagance and spectacle in his book, More: The Vanishing of Scale in an Over-the-Top Nation.

Friday, August 21, 2015: Bob talks with former astronaut Chris Hadfield about a few of his 4,000 hours spent in space, and about his book An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything.  While on his mission aboard the International Space Station, Hadfield attracted the world’s attention when he released a series of photos and educational videos about life in space. His version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity received over 10 million views in its first three days online.  Then – we’ll remember our trip down to Cape Canaveral to witness a night launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. Bob talks with public radio’s resident expert on the NASA and the space program, Pat Duggins. He’s written several books on the subject, including The Final Countdown which deals with the end of the Shuttle program.

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 15-16, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

One of the most legendary moments in rock-n-roll history started with an ad placed in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal:  “Young men with unlimited capital looking for interesting, legitimate investment opportunities and business propositions.”   That “Aquarian Exposition” took place 46 years ago this weekend.  Greg Walter worked on the backstage crew of Woodstock and came away with more than his share of stories, which he includes in Woodstock: A New Look - along with photographs he shot during the festival.

 

HOUR TWO:

In 1939, this was the opening weekend for a bold new film.  Bob talks with historian John Fricke about the cast and history of the American classic The Wizard of Oz.

Then, we’ll help celebrate the 70th birthday of Steve Martin. The actor, comedian, writer, musician and all around Renaissance man returned to the banjo on his second album Rare Bird Alert.  Martin is joined on the CD by the bluegrass group The Steep Canyon Rangers, with special guests The Dixie Chicks and Paul McCartney singing a couple of Martin’s original tunes.

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 10-14, 2015)

Monday, August 10, 2015: Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis has appeared on this program every year since 2005.  For five years, he was our regular music reviewer.  And every year, he comes back at Christmas time to review his favorite songs and albums of the past 12 months. In 2005, he talked to Bob about his book titled In Other Words: Artists Talk About Life and Work. It was a collection of his own writings and interviews with some of rock and roll’s biggest stars.  Then Bob talks with DeCurtis about a later book.  Blues and Chaos is a collection of pieces written by legendary music critic Robert Palmer.  The articles, which appeared originally in Rolling Stone and the New York Times, were arranged thematically and edited by DeCurtis.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015: There’s an old adage that only two things in life are certain: taxes and death. But modern medicine has made the latter less certain. These days, dead people can live for a long time on life support. For instance, stroke victims are regularly kept alive long enough to donate their organs, and brain-dead pregnant women are sometimes kept alive long enough to deliver their babies. Dick Teresi details the long, complicated history of the changing definition of death in his book, The Undead: Organ Harvesting, the Ice-Water Test, Beating-Heart Cadavers – How Medicine Is Blurring the Line Between Life and Death.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015: Bob talks to Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Ron Suskind, and his wife, Cornelia Kennedy, about the challenges of raising their autistic son, as detailed in Suskind’s book titled Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism.  Just before his third birthday, their chatty, cheerful son suddenly stopped talking or making eye contact.  He eventually re-learned how to express himself by watching, memorizing, and impersonating characters from Disney animated films. Then a different look at Disney. Director Don Hahn and producer Peter Schneider discuss their documentary Waking Sleeping Beauty. It’s a behind-the-scenes view into the turf battle at the Disney studios between the old animators and new innovators as the studios made the difficult transition from the bleak 1980s to its glory days following the success of The Little Mermaid.

Thursday, August 13, 2015: Berlin was divided on this date in 1961.  Two days later, work began on The Berlin Wall, the famous symbol of division between East and West … The Iron Curtain.  Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck is the director and screenwriter of the political thriller, The Lives of Others. The Oscar-winning film begins in East Berlin in 1984, ends in 1991 and focuses on the Stasi, the German Democratic Republic’s vast network of informers that at one time numbered 200,000 people. Then an earlier chapter in Berlin’s history. The Berlin Airlift has been called the first battle of the cold war. For almost a year, young men flew old planes over Berlin dropping food, fuel, medicine — even candy — to the two million people below. In his book Daring Young Men, historian Richard Reeves tells the stories of the civilian airmen who carried out one of history’s largest humanitarian campaigns. 

Friday, August 14, 2015: In 1939, this was the opening weekend for a bold new film.  Bob talks with historian John Fricke about the cast and history of the American classic The Wizard of Oz. Then, we’ll help celebrate the 70th birthday of Steve Martin. The actor, comedian, writer, musician and all around Renaissance man returned to the banjo on his second album Rare Bird Alert.  Martin is joined on the CD by bluegrass group The Steep Canyon Rangers, with special guests The Dixie Chicks and Paul McCartney singing a couple of Martin’s original tunes.

 

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 8-9, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

It’s been 70 years since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world’s first and so far only uses of atomic weapons during war.  The A-bomb was the brainchild of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the brilliant physicist whose postwar advocacy for a nuclear weapons ban brought him into conflict with the same military and government on whose behalf he had created the ultimate weapon.  Bob speaks with Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin, authors of American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer.

 

HOUR TWO: 

From 1942 until 1949, Oak Ridge, Tennessee did not exist on any map.  It was a secret city, built and operated by the United States Army as one of the sites of the Manhattan Project.  And although at its peak 75,000 people lived there, most had no idea what they were working on until the day the bomb was dropped.   There are still plenty of Manhattan Project alumni living in Oak Ridge, and Bob spoke with several of them a few years ago for our original documentary titled Secret City. Colleen Black started working as a leak detector when she was just 18-years-old; Bill Wilcox became the city’s historian after working as a chemist during the war; and Richard Lord arrived 10 days after graduating with an electrical engineering degree. Sadly, both Wilcox and Black have passed away since our visit.

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 3-7, 2015)

 

Monday, August 3, 2015: Today we offer some inspiration as you try to squeeze in one more road trip this summer. Ever the Englishman, writer, actor, and comedian Stephen Fry traveled across the United States in a black London cab, visiting all 50 states to experience first-hand what makes America unique.  Fry stopped in Georgia for Thanksgiving, marched in a Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, learned how to pick a banjo with hillbillies, and palled around with Ted Turner on his Montana ranch.  Fry’s book is appropriately titled, Stephen Fry in America: Fifty States and the Man Who Set Out to See Them All.  Then, another long drive. After he left the White House, Harry Truman drove his car from Independence, Missouri to New York City and back again, stopping at motels and diners just like any other tourist.  Matthew Algeo retraces the excursion in Harry Truman’s Excellent Adventure: The True Story of a Great American Road Trip.

Tuesday, August 4, 2015: Over 100 years after his death, Frederick Law Olmsted is still America’s most famous and influential landscape architect.  The designer of Central Park, the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, and many other notable projects, Olmsted was also a conservationist, fighting to preserve Niagara Falls and Yosemite for future generations.  Biographer Justin Martin details his life in Genius of Place: the Life of Frederick Law Olmsted: Abolitionist, Conservationist, and Designer of Central Park.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015: From 1942 until 1949, Oak Ridge, Tennessee did not exist on any map.  It was a secret city, built and operated by the United States Army as one of the sites of the Manhattan Project.  And although at its peak 75,000 people lived there, most had no idea what they were working on until the day the bomb was dropped.   There are still plenty of Manhattan Project alumni living in Oak Ridge, and Bob spoke with several of them during a visit. Colleen Black started working as a leak detector when she was just 18-years-old; Bill Wilcox, now the city’s historian, worked as chemist; and Richard Lord arrived 10 days after graduating with an electrical engineering degree.

Thursday, August 6, 2015: August 6 marks the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima blast, the world’s first use of an atomic weapon in war.  The A-bomb was the brainchild of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the brilliant physicist whose postwar advocacy for a nuclear weapons ban brought him into conflict with the same military and government on whose behalf he had created the ultimate weapon.  Bob speaks with Kai Bird and Martin Sherwin, authors of American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer.

Friday, August 7, 2015: Capital punishment is a controversial topic. The death penalty is debated…death row inmates are sometimes granted clemency…sometimes, new evidence clears them completely. But there is another, quieter death penalty being served right now by roughly 50,000 American prisoners. They are inmates who have been sentenced to “life without parole” – who are destined to live the rest of their lives behind bars. They know that they won’t leave until they die. Bob talks with husband and wife filmmakers Alan and Susan Raymond about their brand new documentary on the subject called Toe Tag Parole. Then, on this date in 1974, a young Frenchman named Philippe Petit pulled off the “artistic crime of the century.” After eight months of planning, Petit, aided by a band of co-conspirators, rigged a high wire between the Twin Towers at the World Trade Center and then spent nearly an hour dancing between the two.  The cops were waiting for him when he finally came off the wire.  Unsure of what crime he had committed, the NYPD charged him with Man on Wire. That’s the name of the Academy Award-winning documentary about Petit directed by my other guest, James Marsh.

 

Bob Edwards Weekend (August 1-2, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Blues guitar great Buddy Guy just celebrated his 79th birthday and he has a brand new CD out called Born to Play Guitar.  Guy’s father bought him his first guitar, a “worn-in instrument with two strings,” for $4.35.  Since then, Guy says life “ain’t never been the same.”  Bob talks to Guy about his music and his journey from Lettsworth, Louisiana to Chicago and beyond.  Buddy Guy wrote about it all in his memoir titled When I Left Home: My Story.  

 

HOUR TWO:

Today we’ll talk about some inspirational summer trips.  First, Bob talks with travel writer Rick Steves.  Throughout his career, Steves has advocated for thoughtful and informed traveling in his PBS series, his radio show, and of course his best-selling travel guide books.   In his book, Travel as a Political Act, Steves writes about why we travel and how being a good traveler creates positive ties with the citizens of other nations. 

Then, Bob talks to Keith Bellows, former editor of National Geographic Traveler magazine. Bellows compiled a list of the 500 greatest trips the world has to offer, encompassing every continent and every possible mode of transportation, including the world’s top 10 elevator rides. That book is titled Journeys of a Lifetime.

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (July 27-31, 2015)

 

Monday, July 27, 2015: Decision fatigue can affect everyone from a judge on a long day of hearing cases, to a quarterback late in the game, to a shopper at IKEA trying to pick out wall mounts and drawer pulls. But what people don’t realize is that making decisions uses the very same willpower that you use to say no to doughnuts, drugs or illicit sex. New York Times science writer John Tierney investigates the connection in his book titled Willpower: The Science Behind Decision Making and Self Control. Then, Bob talks with multi-instrumentalist Andrew Bird about his career and the music from his CD called Break It Yourself. Primarily known as a violinist, Bird has been playing since he was four, and collaborated with the Squirrel Nut Zippers during their later recordings.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015: The rest of the week is devoted to birthdays. Jim Davis turns 70 today. He started out writing and drawing a comic strip called Gnorm Gnat.  It ran for five years in an Indiana newspaper, but when Davis tried to take it national, an editor told him, “Your art is good, your gags are great, but bugs — nobody can relate with bugs!” And so the bugs were replaced with an ornery, chubby, orange cat who loves lasagna and hates Mondays. Garfield made his first appearance in 1978.  It’s now the most widely syndicated comic strip in the world — translated into 45 languages and delighting more than 200 million readers. Jim Davis has kept the Garfield operation in his home state, Indiana, where Paws, Inc., employs about 50 people, most life-long employees.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015: Long before he directed The Last Picture Show and Mask, Peter Bogdanovich was an enthusiastic moviegoer who spent hours upon hours in the theater, watching everything he could. So it makes sense that in 2005 Turner Classic Movies asked him to host The Essentials, their weekly showing of Hollywood’s greatest movies. Bob and Bogdanovich talk about his list of essential movies, the history of American film, and about the director’s art. Bogdanovich is turning 76 years old.

Thursday, July 30, 2015: Blues guitar great Buddy Guy celebrates his 79th birthday today. His father bought him his first guitar, a “worn-in instrument with two strings,” for $4.35.  Since then, Guy says life “ain’t never been the same.”  Bob talks to Guy about his music and journey from Lettsworth, Louisiana to Chicago and beyond.  Buddy Guy wrote about it all in his memoir titled When I Left Home: My Story.   

Friday, July 31, 2015: Stanley Jordan is one of the most innovative jazz guitarists around today.  Known for his “tapping technique,” which he demonstrates for Bob, Jordan has inspired an entire generation of musicians. Jordan joins Bob in the studio to play a few tunes, discuss his career and his passion for music therapy. Today, Stanley Jordan celebrates his 56th birthday.