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Friday
Jan162015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (January 19-23, 2015)

 

Monday, January 19, 2015: In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday we bring back Bob’s conversation with Clarence Jones.  Jones served as Dr. King’s attorney and advisor for eight years and helped craft some of King’s most beloved speeches. Jones is the author of What Would Martin Say and of Behind the Dream: The Making of a Speech that Transformed a Nation. Then, Bob talks with Rolling Stone contributing editor Anthony DeCurtis about a collection of CDs titled Let Freedom Sing: The Music of the Civil Rights Movement

Tuesday, January 20, 2015: Following World War II, the United States secretly brought over a number of former Nazi scientists, ignoring and hiding their crimes against humanity.  Best-selling author Annie Jacobsen details this covert plan in her book Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program That Brought Nazi Scientists to America. Then, in the last few decades, there have been hundreds of changes to the experience of parenting.  Jennifer Senior writes about them in her book titled All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood. Both books are out in paperback today.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015: Bob speaks with Eugene Jarecki, director of the documentary Why We Fight.  Inspired by the U.S. government-funded propaganda films of Frank Capra during World War Two, Jarecki updates the reasons why the United States goes to war and strips away the pro-government biases of Capra’s work.

Thursday, January 22, 2015: Melissa Fay Greene was on this program in 2006 to talk about a middle-class Ethiopian widow whose home became a refuge for hundreds of AIDS-orphaned children.  She told that story in her book There Is No Me Without You. In the years since then, Greene and her husband have adopted four children from Ethiopia. Those kids joined another son adopted from Bulgaria as well as Greene’s four other children by birth. When the number of children hit nine, Greene turned her reporter’s eye to events at home and she wrote No Biking in the House Without a Helmet. Greene says she titled the book after one of the dumbest things she ever said to her children.

Friday, January 23, 2015: Bob talks with Mark Johnson, the founder of Playing for Change and the producer of two albums recorded by the street musicians Johnson has met since he started the organization in 2004. The group’s breakout hit was a cover of “Stand by Me” recorded by many different musicians around the world and in their own style. That video mixed them all together and has more than 40 million views on YouTube. Then, Bob talks with Clarence Bekker, Grandpa Elliott and Jason Tamba, just a few of the international musicians affiliated with the band.  The members of Playing for Change were here in 2012 to talk about their album titled PFC 2: Songs Around the World.

Friday
Jan162015

Bob Edwards Weekend (January 17-18, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Environmentalist John Francis went 17 years without saying a word. He was tired of having to explain to people why he gave up using motorized transportation – a personal boycott which lasted 22 years. Francis shares with Bob what he learned about listening and about the kindness of strangers.  He wrote about his experiences in the books, Planetwalker and more recently The Ragged Edge of Silence.

 

HOUR TWO:

After being our guest four times on this program, southern musician and storyteller Paul Thorn is a friend of the show and a fan favorite. He was most influenced by his father, a Pentacostal preacher – and by his uncle – an actual pimp who also trained Thorn to be a professional boxer. Thorn’s latest CD is titled Too Blessed to Be Stressed.

Next, roots music titan Delbert McClinton talks with Bob about his early days in music, dodging beer bottles and fistfights on stage - to trading harmonica licks with a young John Lennon.

Then, although considered by some to be a country musician, Lyle Lovett’s sound blends blues, gospel, jazz, and folk with a country sensibility.  He’ll talk with Bob about his music career and perform a couple of songs from his album It’s Not Big, It’s Large.

Friday
Jan092015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (January 12-16, 2015)

 

Monday, January 12, 2015: After being our guest four times, southern musician and storyteller Paul Thorn is a friend of the show and a fan favorite. He was most influenced by his father, a Pentacostal preacher – and by his uncle – a pimp who also trained Thorn to be a professional boxer.  When he first appeared on this program in 2008, Thorn was promoting his CD called A Long Way from Tupelo.  Now he’s headlining a music cruise in the Caribbean – which we will also discuss.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015: Roots music titan Delbert McClinton talks with Bob about his early days in music, dodging beer bottles and joining fistfights on stage - to trading harmonica licks with a young John Lennon. McClinton and fellow Texas troubadour Glen Clark have been playing music together since the 1960s. But Blind, Crippled and Crazy was their first new album together in 40 years.  The two country music greats join Bob to talk about their collaboration and why McClinton says he has more fun singing with Clark than anybody else.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015: Bob talks with Elizabeth Cook about the music from her CD Welder and about hosting her own show on satellite radio. Cook is the host of Apron Strings on Outlaw Country here on Sirius XM. Next, Bob visits with Jill Sobule. After parting ways with several record labels, she decided to raise all the funds for her 2009 album through contributions from her fans.   The result is her CD titled California Years. Then Bob talks with Roger Blevins about the music of his oddly named band, Mingo Fishtrap.  They combine the sounds of Memphis and New Orleans, with a little north Texas thrown in, to create a funky sound all their own. The group’s latest album is titled On Time.

Thursday, January 15, 2015: Singer-songwriter Kevin Welch left his Oklahoma home at age 17 to pursue a life in music, settling in Nashville in 1978. Welch was very active in the local club scene, performing with different bands and finally his own band - The Overtones. Welch was here in 2010 to discuss his career and the music from his CD titled A Patch of Blue Sky.  Then, we’ll enjoy a performance chat with singer Kate Campbell and keyboard player Spooner Oldham – who is one of the musicians responsible for the Muscle Shoals Sound of the 1960s. Campbell and Oldham perform some of the songs from their gospel album titled For the Living of These Days.

Friday, January 16, 2015: And we’ll conclude this week of musical interviews with Lyle Lovett.  Although considered by some to be a country musician, Lovett’s sound blends blues, gospel, jazz, and folk with a country sensibility.  He’ll talk with Bob about his music career, his acting career and about the music from two of his albums - It’s Not Big, It’s Large and Natural Forces.

 

Friday
Jan092015

Bob Edwards Weekend (January 10-11, 2015)

HOUR ONE:

Five years ago - on January 12, 2010 – an earthquake further devastated what was already the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. In Haiti, tens of thousands were killed, more than a million people were displaced and countless buildings in the capital city Port-au-Prince were destroyed.  Bob talks with Jane Regan and Whitney Dow, producers of a documentary called Unfinished Country, about the problems faced by Haiti before the earthquake. Then Mark Schneider of the International Crisis Group talked with Bob just a week after the disaster.  He details the hurdles faced by Haiti moving forward.  And we also hear from Sirius XM radio host Joe Madison who made two reporting trips to Haiti in the aftermath of the earthquake.

 

HOUR TWO:    

Bob talks with director Richard Linklater about his latest movie Boyhood which he filmed over 12 actual years. The only special effect is watching the main character grow up on screen…starting in elementary school and ending on his first day of college.  The story follows family moves, unfortunate stepfathers and broken hearts and stars newcomer Ellar Coltrane as Mason, and Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke as his biological parents. Boyhood is being released today on DVD and both the film and Linklater are serious contenders for Academy Awards this year. 

 

“If you smoked Colombian weed in the 1970s and 1980s,” writes Tony Dokoupil, “you paid for my swim lessons, bought me my first baseball glove and kept me in the best private school in south Florida.” Dokoupil’s dad smuggled tons of marijuana into the country before his luck finally ran out. Bob talks to Dokoupil about his memoir, The Last Pirate: A Father, His Son, and the Golden Age of Marijuana. It’s now out in paperback.

    

Monday
Jan052015

Robert Duvall, from Godfather to Get Low

NOTE: This was first posted in August of 2010. 

By Ariana Pekary, producer

Robert Duvall lives on a farm out in rural Virginia and he loves the tango (and his Argentine wife, of course). The actor lives life to its fullest and holds nothing back – something that I think is very apparent in his interview with Bob. He’s been a mob lawyer in The Godfather, a Texas Ranger in Lonesome Dove, and now a man with a mysterious secret in Get Low. (Bill Murray co-stars as the funeral director in that film, making it a must-see on my movie list.)  You can find release dates for your area here.  

For you Lonesome Dove fans out there, here’s an encore scene from that 1989 mini-series.

 

Giddy-up!