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Monday
Aug252014

Hear Bob Edwards Weekend from August 23-24, 2014

Sunday
Aug242014

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (August 25-29, 2014)

The Bob Edwards Show, August 25-29, 2014

Monday, August 25, 2014:  Journalist Helen Thorpe takes us inside the minds of three women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan for twelve years. Thorpe talks with Bob about these women and her book Soldier Girls: The Battles of Three Women At Home And At War.  Then, Wall Street Journal music critic Will Friedwald calls French vocalist Cyrille Aimée “one of the most promising jazz singers of her generation.” The inventive songstress joins Bob to discuss her latest album It’s A Good Day. 

Tuesday, August 26, 2014:  Best-selling author and master storyteller Ben Macintyre (Operation Mincemeat) focuses his most recent book on Britain’s, and possibly the world’s, most notorious spy.  Charming and brilliant, MI6 agent Kim Philby rose to the top of Britain’s counterintelligence agency all the while passing information on to Russia.  Macintyre’s book is A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Greatest Betrayal.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014:  Three-quarters of Americans’ eyes never switch to night vision because most of us never experience true darkness. In fact, there are only a handful of places in the United States where total darkness can exist. In his new book, The End of Night, Paul Bogard explores the deleterious effect of dark deprivation upon our world.   Then, with the Cold War long over, there seems little threat of an all-out nuclear war.  But, as investigative journalist Eric Schlosser points out in his book, Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety, most of those weapons are not only still out there, they are on hair-trigger alert.  Drawing recently declassified government documents and his own interviews with military personnel and nuclear scientists, Schlosser illuminates our illusion of nuclear safety. Command and Control is now available in paperback.

Thursday, August 28, 2014:   In the new film, Love Is Strange, award-winning actor Alfred Molina plays George, a Catholic school teacher, who, after 39 years, marries his partner Ben, played by John Lithgow.  When George’s employer learns of his marriage, they fire him, sending the newlyweds on a difficult journey.  Love Is Strange opens wide August 29th.  Then, over fifty years ago, writer Michael Harrington’s book, The Other America, predicted that unless American society addressed it’s widespread poverty problem, another journalist decades later would write about the exact same conditions that he had chronicled.  Journalist Sasha Abramsky has done just that.  His book, The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives, tells the stories of people around the country who are struggling to make it.  The American Way of Poverty is available in paperback.

Friday, August 29, 2014:  Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.  Then, in 2000, DJ John Peel called country singer-songwriter Laura Cantrell’s debut album, Not the Tremblin’ Kind, “my favorite record of the last ten years and possibly my life.”  Cantrell joins Bob in our performance studio to talk about her work and play a few tunes off her new album No Way There From Here.  And finally, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

Friday
Aug222014

Bob Edwards Weekend Lineup (August 23-24, 2014)

Bob Edwards Weekend, August 23-24, 2014

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

Bob talks to Daniel Lieberman, author of The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease.  Lieberman is the Chair of the Department of Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.  His book explains how millions of years of evolution have led our bodies to a paradoxical position.  People in developed countries are living longer than ever, having vanquished diseases that used to kill people by the millions:  smallpox, measles, polio and the plague. But we are also afflicted with more chronic, preventable illnesses and ailments, such as diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, strokes, dementia, depression and anxiety.

Then, the latest essay from children’s author and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with Michael Wallis, author of the book The Lincoln Highway: Coast to Coast from Times Square to the Golden Gate.  It’s a trip across the United States through a bygone era, before interstates turned roadside kitsch into monotony.

Salon.com senior book critic Laura Miller shares with Bob books to help us through the final dog days of summer, and she offers a preview of this year’s best fall books.

Bob Edwards Weekend airs on Sirius XM Public Radio (Channel 121) Saturdays from 8-10 AM ET. 

Visit Bob Edwards Weekend on PRI’s website to find local stations that air the program.
Monday
Aug182014

This Week on The Bob Edwards Show (August 18-22, 2014)

The Bob Edwards Show, August 18-22, 2014

Monday, August 18, 2014:  Bob talks to Daniel Lieberman, author of The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease.  Lieberman is the Chair of the Department of Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.  His book explains how millions of years of evolution have led our bodies to a paradoxical position.  People in developed countries are living longer than ever, having vanquished diseases that used to kill people by the millions:  smallpox, measles, polio and the plague. But we are also afflicted with more chronic, preventable illnesses and ailments, such as diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers, strokes, dementia, depression and anxiety.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014:  A few years ago, this program aired a documentary about “The Human Terrain System,” an audacious military social science experiment that operates on the premise that soldiers need to understand the enemy and its culture. But it’s proven brutally difficult to implement in Afghanistan as Vanessa Gezari documents in her book, The Tender Soldier: A True Story of War and Sacrifice and it’s available in paperback.  Then, Neko Case takes a break mid-way through her grueling tour to talk with Bob about her latest album with the impossibly long title, The Worse Things get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You.  This is the 42-year-old Indy musician’s sixth studio album, and it comes from a three-year period she describes as full of “grief and mourning.” Both of her parents, a grandparent, and several close friends all passed away in the space of just a few years.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014:  Thirteen days before he was scheduled to leave Vietnam, the vehicle Robert Timberg was traveling in struck a land mine. He survived, barely, but was left permanently disfigured with third-degree burns over his face and body. After the war, he became a journalist and covered the Iran-Contra scandal which involved three of his fellow Naval Academy graduates, Oliver North, Bud McFarlane, and John Poindexter.  Now the author of The Nightingale’s Song looks back on his struggle to reclaim his life in a new memoir, Blue Eyed Boy.

Thursday, August 21, 2014:   Google maps and contemporary exploration have given us access—at least remotely—of some of the most far flung places on the Earth, so much so that it seems as though there is little left to discover.  Not so, says social geographer, Alastair Bonnett, in his book Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies.  Then, Bob talks with Jake Shimabukuro about his music and his chosen instrument. The native Hawaiian has been called “the Jimi Hendrix of the ukulele” and Shimabukuro’s CD is titled Peace Love Ukulele. He’ll perform several new and old songs for us in our studio.

Friday, August 22, 2014:  Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.  Then, Joshua Horwitz’s new book has been described as a non-fiction eco-thriller.  In War of the Whales we meet a marine researcher who teamed up with an environmental lawyer to prove that the mass strandings of whales occurring around the globe were being caused by high-intensity sonar used by the U.S. Navy.  The investigation culminated in a landmark 2008 Supreme Court case that ruled for the Navy, but the battle to save whale habitats continues.  And finally, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

Thursday
Aug142014

Summer Book Recomendations

Here are Salon.com senior book critic Laura Miller’s recomendation for the end of summer:

Haruki Murakami’s Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Year of Pilgrimage

David Shafer’s Whiskey Tango Foxtrot  

Deborah Halber’s The Skeleton Crew

Joanna Rakoff’s My Salinger Year

Rachel Hope Cleve’s Charity and Sylvia: A Same Sex Marriage in Early America

Garret Keizer Getting Schooled: The Reeducation of an American Teacher