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Friday
Jun262015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (June 29-July 3, 2015)

 

Monday, June 29, 2015: Legendary guitarists George Harrison, Pete Townshend and Brian Setzer all wailed on the same axe, the Gretsch 6120. First sold in the 1950s with the endorsement of Chet Atkins, the 6120 has since become a favorite of guitarists the world over. Author and guitar aficionado Edward Ball and his fellow guitarist Fred Stuckey play selections on the renowned instrument and illuminate why the Gretsch is so well loved. Then, Bob talks with Brian Setzer about his Gretsch guitars, his four decades in the music business, the hits in the 1980s with The Stray Cats, his 18-piece “orchestra” and his CD, Setzer Goes Instru-mental. The eleven tracks feature Brian Setzer on guitar and banjo playing a mix of original compositions and covers like Blue Moon of Kentucky, Be-Bop-A-Lula and Earl’s Breakdown.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015:  In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a high-level Pentagon official and Vietnam War strategist, leaked 7,000 pages of top secret documents about the war to the press. It was a Defense Department study never meant to be seen by the public. Its publication in the New York Times proved the war was based on lies and eventually led to president Richard Nixon’s resignation and the end of America’s involvement in Vietnam. Bob talks with Ellsberg about his decision to release the “Pentagon Papers” and with filmmakers Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith about their documentary called The Most Dangerous Man in America. On this date in 1971, the US Supreme Court ruled in favor of allowing the New York Times and the Washington Post to continue publishing the documents and Ellsberg was indicted for theft and espionage.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015: The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme is the title of a book by award-winning investigative cartoonist Joe Sacco.  This illustrated timeline explains the events of the first great battle of World War I. Then - something completely different as you start to plan a summer road trip. Do you often honk at other drivers or think rude gestures are a good way to teach people better driving etiquette?  Bob talks with writer Tom Vanderbilt about his book Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (And What It Says About Us). It examines traffic patterns and driving behaviors to better understand our individual and collective psyche.

Thursday, July 2, 2015: On this date in 1937, Amelia Earhart’s plane disappeared over the Pacific Ocean, as she and her navigator Fred Noonan attempted to circle the globe. They were declared dead, but neither their bodies nor the plane’s wreckage were ever found. Bob looks for answers with biographer Susan Wels, author of Amelia Earhart: The Thrill of It. Then, the average American uses 150 gallons of water per day. In the developing world, the average is five. Even then, the water is often contaminated: The United Nations estimates that dirty water is responsible for the deaths of 500 children each day. Water is the third largest industry in the world, right behind electricity and oil. But can anyone really own water? That’s the question Irena Salina investigates in her documentary, Flow.  

Friday, July 3, 2015: We’ve assembled a special batch of conversations to celebrate the Fourth of July weekend. Bob talks with Peter Sagal, host of the NPR quiz show Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. A few years ago, he set out across America on a motorcycle to find out what we as citizens of this nation know – and how we feel – about the our founding document.  The result was a four-part documentary called Constitution USA with Peter Sagal.  The series is available online at PBS.  Next, we’ll talk about our new citizens. Each year, about one million people renounce the country of their birth and swear allegiance to the United States of America.  A few years ago, one of those new American citizens was the Dutch-born husband of filmmaker Alexandra Pelosi. “I can’t be a foreigner in my own family,” Pelosi recalls her husband saying. His story inspired Pelosi to travel the country attending naturalization ceremonies and hearing the stories of brand-new Americans. Her film is titled Citizen USA: A 50 State Road Trip. Then an essay from children’s author Daniel Pinkwater about his father’s personal journey as a naturalized citizen.

 

Friday
Jun262015

Bob Edwards Weekend (June 27-28, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

As an ex-felon, writer Jack Gantos might have seemed like an odd choice to win the 2012 Newbery Medal, the most prestigious award in children’s literature.   But Gantos has been writing acclaimed books for young people for years, including his popular Joey Pigza series.  Now he’s written two novels Dead End in Norvelt and the sequel From Norvelt to Nowhere.  Gantos talks with Bob about these two almost-but-not-quite true books, as well as his own surprising tales from his unusual past.

 

HOUR TWO:

Today we offer a collection of conversations with some of the biggest names in children’s literature.  Bob talks with writer Kate DiCamillo whose young adult novels have been honored with some of the genres most prestigious awards, including the Newberry Medal for The Tale of Despereaux.  Then Bob visits with British author Neil Gaiman.  He’s the author of many award-winning books, including Coraline and The Graveyard Book, which follows the story of young Nobody Owens who lives, where else - in a graveyard.

Next up is Daniel Handler, better known as Lemony Snicket, the author of the popular “children’s” tales A Series of Unfortunate Events. Then Bob talks with Irish writer Eoin Colfer about his famous series of Artemis Fowl books.

Beloved writer Judy Blume has been the voice of young people’s literature for over 40 years.  The author of Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, the Fudge books, and many others, Blume has added screenwriter to her resume.  Based on her 1981 novel, Tiger Eyes follows a young woman forced to cope with the aftermath of her father’s murder.  

Friday
Jun192015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (June 22-26, 2015)

Monday, June 22, 2015: Today we begin a week-long series of interviews about books for kids. Bob talks with writer Kate DiCamillo whose young adult novels works have been honored with some of the genres most prestigious awards, including the Newberry Award.  DiCamillo’s third novel, The Tale of Despereaux, was even turned into an animated film.  Next, Bob talks with William Joyce. He’s the author and illustrator of many beloved children’s books, including George Shrinks and Rolie Polie Olie, both of which are Emmy Award winning TV shows.  He is also a commercial illustrator whose has graced multiple New Yorker covers and a filmmaker who contributed to Toy Story, A Bug’s Life and Robots.   He also wrote The Man in the Moon, the first in a series called The Guardians of Childhood.  Joyce turned that book into a film for DreamWorks Animation.  Then, Bob talks with the 2013 Caldecott Medal winner Jon Klassen, author and illustrator of This Is Not My Hat and 2011’s I Want My Hat Back

Tuesday, June 23, 2015:  Caldecott award-winning illustrator Brian Selznick is the author of 2007’s The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was turned into a movie by director Martin Scorsese.  Selznick talks with Bob about that book and about Wonder Struck, which tells two congruent tales, one in illustrations and the other in words. Then, Bob talks with illustrator Chris Van Allsburg, a three-time Caldecott winner and the creator of a number of classic children’s books, including Jumanji, The Polar Express, and The Z Was Zapped.  In 1984, Van Allsburg drew The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, a series of illustrations that hint at stories.  More than a dozen notable writers – Sherman Alexie, Jules Fieffer, Gregory Maguire among them – along with millions of school children – have written short stories to go with each illustration in a book titled The Chronicles of Harris Burdick.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015: Bob talks with British author Neil Gaiman about his career of writing for kids and his many award-winning books, including Coraline and The Graveyard Book, which follows the story of young Nobody Owens who lives, where else - in a graveyard. Next up is Daniel Handler, better known as Lemony Snicket, the author of the popular “children’s” tales A Series of Unfortunate Events. Then Bob talks with Irish writer Eoin Colfer about his famous series, the highly popular Artemis Fowl books for young people.

Thursday, June 25, 2015: Beloved writer Judy Blume has been the voice of young people’s literature for over 40 years.  The author of Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, the Fudge books, and many others, Blume has added screenwriter to her resume.  Based on her 1981 novel, Tiger Eyes follows a young woman forced to cope with the aftermath of her father’s murder.  Then, Bob talks with children’s book author Norton Juster. He’s the author of the classics The Phantom Tollbooth and The Dot and The Line.  In 2011, he teamed up again with friend and illustrator Jules Feiffer for the book titled The Odious Ogre.

Friday, June 26, 2015: As an ex-felon, writer Jack Gantos might have seemed like an odd choice to win the 2012 Newbery Medal, the most prestigious award in children’s literature.   But Gantos has been writing acclaimed books for young people for years, including his popular Joey Pigza series.  Now he’s written two novels Dead End in Norvelt and the sequel From Norvelt to Nowhere.  Gantos talks with Bob about these two almost-but-not-quite true books, as well as his own surprisingly true tales from his unusual past.

 

Friday
Jun192015

Bob Edwards Weekend (June 20-21, 2015)

 

HOUR ONE:

We begin with a brand new interview with jazz guitarist John Pizzarelli.  He tells Bob about his latest album, a tribute to the songs of Johnny Mercer.  Then, more with Pizzarelli.  He grew up surrounded by music royalty, including his father, Bucky.  Benny Goodman and Les Paul were regular guests in their home, and John has played with some of the most memorable artists of the past half century: Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Rosemary Clooney, James Taylor and Paul McCartney to name a few.  Pizzarelli will share the stories of his life. His book is titled World on a String: A Musical Memoir.

 

HOUR TWO:

For Father’s Day weekend, Bob talks with bestselling author Michael Lewis – not about the latest financial scandal on Wall Street, but about the unexpected joys and challenges of being a dad. Lewis is the author of Home Game: An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood.

Bob talks with Bobby Bare and his son Bobby Bare Jr. They’ll discuss their relationship, as well as the CD they co-produced which celebrates the songwriting of Shel Silverstein. It’s called Twistable, Turnable Man and features contributions from My Morning Jacket, John Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Ray Price, Todd Snider, Lucinda Williams and Nanci Griffith. The Bares each sing a song as well with Sr. covering “The Living Legend” and Jr. singing the grown-up lead vocals with his daughter on “Daddy What If.”

Friday
Jun122015

The Bob Edwards Show Schedule (June 15-19, 2015)

 

Monday, June 15, 2015: We begin with a brand new interview with jazz guitarist John Pizzarelli.  He tells Bob about his latest album, a tribute to the songs of Johnny Mercer.  Then, more with Pizzarelli.  He grew up surrounded by music royalty, including his father, Bucky.  Benny Goodman and Les Paul were regular guests in their home, and John has played with some of the most memorable: Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Rosemary Clooney, James Taylor and Paul McCartney.  Pizzarelli will share the stories of his life as he wrote in his book World on a String: A Musical Memoir.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015Garret Keizer opens his book with the admission that “noise is not the most important problem in the world.” But by examining noise in history, in culture, in our own backyards, Keizer argues that we can find answers to some of the big questions. His book is titled The Unwanted Sound of Everything We Want: A Book About Noise.  Then, for the millions of fan who didn’t get to see the Beatles, there’s 1964: The Tribute, The Grateful Dead were honored with the Dark Star Orchestra; and for the Rolling Stones, there’s Sticky Fingers, who bill themselves as the “leading international Rolling Stones tribute show.” Writer Steven Kurutz explores this odd world by focusing on Sticky Fingers and their fans in his book, Like A Rolling Stone: The Strange Life of a Tribute Band.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015: On this date in 1971, President Richard Nixon declared drug abuse “public enemy number one” in the United States.  That began this country’s costly and ultimately unwinnable war on drugs.  Bob talks with filmmaker Eugene Jarecki about his remarkable documentary titled The House I Live In. The film explores every level of the “War on Drugs” – from the dealer, the narcotics officer, the inmate, the prison guard to the federal judge and offers a sobering view of our criminal justice system.

Thursday, June 18, 2015: Today is the 73rd birthday of Paul McCartney. To celebrate, Bob spends the hour with Sir Paul’s music and with his biographer. Peter Ames Carlin argues that McCartney was always the Beatles’ musical director – even teaching John Lennon how to play guitar chords and tune his instrument properly. Carlin’s book Paul McCartney: A Life is based on years of research and presents a textured portrait of one of music’s living icons.

Friday, June 19, 2015: On this date 51 years ago, The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed following an 83-day filibuster in the Senate. Bob speaks with two journalists and authors who tell the story behind the creation of the landmark legislation.   Clay Risen is an editor at The New York Times op-ed section and the author of The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act. And Todd Purdum is a senior writer at Politico and the author of An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Two Presidents, Two Parties, and the Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  Then, to prepare you for Father’s Day, Bob talks with Bobby Bare and his son Bobby Bare Jr. They’ll discuss their relationship, as well as the CD they co-produced which celebrates the songwriting of Shel Silverstein. It’s called Twistable Turnable Man and features contributions from My Morning Jacket, John Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Ray Price, Todd Snider, Lucinda Williams and Nanci Griffith. The Bares each sing a song as well with Sr. covering “The Living Legend” and Jr. singing the grown-up lead vocals with his daughter on “Daddy What If.”