Archive
Schedule

Sirius XM Public Radio

XM 121/Sirius 205

M-F 6 AM (ET)

M-F 7 AM

M-F 8 AM

M-F 9 AM

M-F 10 AM

M-F 2 PM

M-F 8 PM

M-F Midnight

(Previous day replay)

M-F 4 AM

M-F 5 AM

 

 

Bob Elsewhere

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Subscribe To Our Blog

  Join Our E-Mail List

The Latest

 

 

 

Sunday
Jul062014

This Week on The Bob Edwards Show (July 7-11, 2014)

The Bob Edwards Show, July 7-11, 2014

Monday, July 7, 2014:  Today, T.E. Lawrence is as much myth as he was man, but the conflict in which he was involved is still relevant in our modern times.  Journalist and author Scott Anderson’s best-selling book Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East looks at the historical impact of Lawrence’s military role.  It is now available in paperback.  Then, the film Dangerous Acts chronicles an underground theater troupe, the Belarus Free Theatre, which performs despite being barred from working for pay within the last surviving Communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe. Madeleine Sackler relied on a very brave camera person who smuggled footage out of the country and onto a plane for her.  Dangerous Acts airs today on HBO.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014:   Bob talks to Serhii Plokhy, director of Harvard University’s Ukrainian Research Institute about his new book, The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union.  Professor Plokhy grew up in Russia, and was educated in Ukraine and the United States.  He says, contrary to the conventional wisdom in the U.S., the collapse of the Soviet Union was triggered by internal political and economic factors, not American pressure.  Then, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014:  Brian Conaghan was an unlikely high school teacher.  Diagnosed with Tourette’s syndrome as an adult, Conaghan spent years trying to deal with and even hide his disorder.  His new YA novel, When Mr. Dog Bites, is a funny and honest look at this misunderstood disorder.  Then, musician Glen Philips is best-known as the front man for the popular 1990s alt rock band Toad the Wet Sprocket.  After a solo career through the 2000s, Philips has reunited with Toad and they are touring this summer.  Philips talks with Bob about his work and the band’s latest album New Constellation.

Thursday, July 10, 2014:  Ted Olson is an unlikely champion of gay marriage. He built his career as a very conservative jurist, serving two republican presidents and successfully arguing the 2000 election case that put George W. Bush in the White House. But it was Olson who led the charge to overturn Proposition 8, California’s ban on same-sex marriage. Olson tells the story of his work on the case in a new book titled Redeeming the Dream: The Case for Marriage Equality.

Friday, July11, 2014:  Ken Vogel is an investigative reporter for POLITICO who covers, among other things, the intersection between money and politics. His new book is titled Big Money: 2.5 Billion Dollars, One Suspicious Vehicle, and a Pimp – on the Trail of the Ultra-Rich Hijacking American Politics.  Then, in the turbulent summer of 1964, Martha and the Vandellas sang: “Callin’ out around the world, are you ready for a brand new beat?”   Writer Mark Kurlansky looks at the impact of that invitation in his book Ready for a Brand New Beat: How “Dancing in the Street” Became the Anthem for a Changing America and it’s available in paperback.

Friday
Jul042014

This Weekend's Program (July 5-6, 2014)

Bob Edwards Weekend, July 5-6, 2014

HOUR ONE:

In his latest thriller, The Director, best-selling author and Washington Post columnist David Ignatius takes readers into the elusive world of the CIA, hackers and contemporary cyber espionage.

In these days of emails, texts and tweets, society as a whole is losing its ability to communicate in more old fashioned ways. Gone are the days of the carefully handwritten and deeply meaningful letter. Shaun Usher is doing his part to preserve the interesting letters that do exist.  He’s the editor of a new book titled Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience.

Then, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

HOUR TWO:

Dancer and choreographer Savion Glover made his Broadway debut at the age of 10, and won a Tony for Bring in ‘D Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk when he was 23. Glover’s latest show is “Savion Glover’s OM” at New York City’s Joyce Theater, and he joins Bob to talk about his life and career.

Bob talks with director Steve James about his latest documentary, Life Itself.  It tells the remarkable story of the late, great film critic Roger Ebert, and is based on his 2011 memoir of the same name. Ebert died last April following a decade-long battle with cancer.

Bob Edwards Weekend airs on Sirius XM Public Radio (XM 121, Sirius 205) Saturdays from 8-10 AM ET. 

Visit Bob Edwards Weekend on PRI’s website to find local stations that air the program.

Monday
Jun302014

Hear Bob Edwards Weekend from June 28-29, 2014

Sunday
Jun292014

This Week on The Bob Edwards Show (June 30 - July 4, 2014)

The Bob Edwards Show, June 30 - July 4, 2014

Monday, June 30, 2014:  For more than a decade, James Joseph Bulger Jr. was listed as one of the FBI’s ten most wanted fugitives.  The former Boston gangster, better known as “Whitey,” was eventually found, tried and convicted of racketeering, extortion and money laundering. He was also found to be complicit in several area murders. The 84 year old is currently serving two consecutive life terms in a federal penitentiary. Filmmaker Joe Berlinger has made a new documentary about the story with a focus on last summer’s trial in Boston. Berlinger talks with Bob about his film Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger.  Then, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014:   Dancer Savion Glover made his Broadway debut at the age of 10, and won a Tony for Bring in ‘D Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk when he was 23.  Glover’s latest show is Savion Glover’s OM at New York City’s Joyce Theater, and he joins Bob to talk about his life and career.  Then, director John Carney went from first-time indie filmmaker working on a tiny budget with musicians instead of actors for his film Once, to seeing his film win an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 2008 Oscars.  His new film, Begin Again, stars Mark Ruffalo and Keira Knightly as two people brought together through the power of music.  Begin Again opens nationwide on July 2nd.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014:   Bob talks to first time novelist Boris Fishman about “A Replacement Life.”  It’s about a struggling young writer who forges Holocaust restitution claims for Soviet Jews living in New York City.  The book is a work of fiction, but Fishman got the idea for the story after helping his grandmother, who escaped from the Minsk ghetto during World War Two, fill out her restitution claim.  Fishman wondered if people ever just made stuff up, to get the money.  So he wasn’t surprised when dozen people were indicted in 2010 for forging Holocaust stories, to the tune of $50 million.   Fishman’s novel, “A Replacement Life” imagines and humanizes people who would have done such a thing.   Boris Fishman was born in Minsk, Belarus, and used to be a fact checker for The New Yorker magazine.

Thursday, July 3, 2014:    Bob talks with director Steve James about his latest documentary, Life Itself.  It tells the remarkable story of the late, great film critic Roger Ebert, and is based on his 2011 memoir of the same name. Ebert died last April following a decade-long battle with cancer.  Then, Bob talks with music blogger Paul Schomer about his latest discoveries. This time, we’ll hear new music from James Tillman, Invisible Homes, Led to Sea, Dogheart and Crocodile.

Friday, July 4, 2014:  Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.  Next, we bring back Bob’s conversation with Pulitzer Prize winning historian David McCullough about 1776, his book on the American Revolution.  It’s written as a companion work to John Adams, his celebrated biography of the second president, and includes research from hundreds of letters and several diaries kept by people on both sides of the conflict.  Then, the latest installment of our ongoing series This I Believe.

Friday
Jun272014

This Weekend's Program (June 28-29, 2014)

Bob Edwards Weekend, June 28-29, 2014

HOUR ONE:

Doyle McManus, Washington columnist for the Los Angeles Times, joins Bob to discuss the latest political news.

For more than a decade, James Joseph Bulger Jr. was listed as one of the FBI’s ten most wanted fugitives.  The former Boston gangster, better known as “Whitey,” was eventually found, tried and convicted of racketeering, extortion and money laundering. He was also found to be complicit in several area murders. The 84 year old is currently serving two consecutive life terms in a federal penitentiary. Filmmaker Joe Berlinger has made a new documentary about the story with a focus on last summer’s trial in Boston. Berlinger talks with Bob about his film Whitey: United States of America v. James J. Bulger.

Then, we hear a new commentary from children’s book writer and illustrator Daniel Pinkwater.

HOUR TWO:

Bob talks with Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton about her participation in Freedom Summer.   Our interview will also feature clips from filmmaker Stanley Nelson’s documentary Freedom Summer.  The film highlights an essential element of the civil rights movement: the patient and long-term efforts by outside activists and local citizens in Mississippi to organize communities and register black voters — even in the face of intimidation, physical violence and death.  Freedom Summer premiered on PBS this week and is available on DVD.

As we near the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Right Act, Bob speaks with two authors of new books that tell the story behind the creation of the landmark legislation. Clay Risen is an editor on The New York Times op-ed page and the author of The Bill of the Century: The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act and Todd Purdum is a senior writer at Politico and the author of An Idea Whose Time Has Come: Two Presidents, Two Parties, and the Battle for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Bob Edwards Weekend airs on Sirius XM Public Radio (XM 121, Sirius 205) Saturdays from 8-10 AM ET. 

Visit Bob Edwards Weekend on PRI’s website to find local stations that air the program.